heliosdayspring:

me: *looks at ocs i made 4 years ago*

me: we can rebuild them. we have the technology

violencegirl:

aint-got-nothin-at-all:

boobsbirdsbotany:


Real life “Rosie the Riveter” - Tennessee, 1943.
From the Library of Congress collection, 1930’s-1940’s in Color. 

GLORIFY THE SHIT OUT OF THIS IMAGE

!!!!!!!!

Painting a more accurate version of history, one reblog at a time.
When I posted this archival image of a “real life Rosie the Riveter” one year ago, I had no idea it would resonate with so many people. 19K and counting. 

violencegirl:

aint-got-nothin-at-all:

boobsbirdsbotany:

Real life “Rosie the Riveter” - Tennessee, 1943.

From the Library of Congress collection, 1930’s-1940’s in Color

GLORIFY THE SHIT OUT OF THIS IMAGE

!!!!!!!!

Painting a more accurate version of history, one reblog at a time.

When I posted this archival image of a “real life Rosie the Riveter” one year ago, I had no idea it would resonate with so many people. 19K and counting. 

WORBLA IS BEING SOLD IN THE U.S.

coelasquid:

teddybearbones:

heatgunning:

blackbanshee:

no more $20 shipping!! there are STORES yes STORES where you can buy official worbla now!!

see for yourself!

Atlanta, GA

Metairie, LA

Omaha, NE

Austin, TX

Conroe, TX

Jacksonville, FL

Burbank, CA

Canada too!

Winnipeg, MB

Toronto, ON

Nanaimo, BC

Calgary, AB

thank you cosplaysupplies!

image

And we’re looking to add more stores every day! We’ve got feelers out in Ottawa, Indianapolis and Edmonton! And hey, if you know a store (are a store) that should carry it, contact us!

omg omg omg.. Active surplus is like 5 minutes from work :3

For my cosplay bros

ariannagrandeofficial:

big-chicken:

cat cat cat cat cat cat cat cat cat

this cat lives in a show horse barn which is why it walks and runs that way

ariannagrandeofficial:

big-chicken:

cat cat cat cat cat cat cat cat cat

this cat lives in a show horse barn which is why it walks and runs that way

andiamburdenedwithgloriousfeels:

theweepyfox:

geometricdeathtrap:

So I needed a way to alert the class that I was going to be showing graphic pictures of genitals on my presentation so I decided that putting this on the slide before would work

image

I want this on a shirt.

Please, I want this on underwear

skullopendra:

paulsrockinpagoda:

noswellicus:

Yesssss

nooooooooooooo

yes

skullopendra:

paulsrockinpagoda:

noswellicus:

Yesssss

nooooooooooooo

yes

maarnayeri:

Let us be vividly clear about this.

What the New York Times did to Michael Brown today was not merely slander. It wasn’t a case of a lack of journalistic integrity.

Highlighting that a black teenager was “no angel” on the day he is being laid to rest after being hunted and…

autieblesam:

[Image is a poster explaining briefly the origin and meaning of green, yellow, and red interaction signal badges, referred to above as Color Communication Badges.]
deducecanoe:

justsjwthings:

oldamongdreams:

greencarnations:

CAN WE DO THESE AT CONS

SECONDED.

if youre not autistic or suffer from an actual disorder, dont use these. its not cute.

er… you know a lot of autistic people go to conventions, right? And people with social anxiety disorders and panic disorders? Shit if I could get away with using this at work I would. 

Hello there, justsjwthings.
I would like to introduce myself.  I refer to myself as Sam Thomas, though my legal name and how a lot of people know me is Matthew.  I am officially diagnosed autistic.
Over one week in June 2013 (last summer), I was in Washington, DC for an autism conference called the Autism Campus Inclusion (ACI) summer leadership program run by the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network for autistic college students.
If you have any question as to the truth of this, I would like to direct your attention to this YouTube video that ASAN produced promoting the above-mentioned conference.  I appear as the first person in the video and you can find more images of my face on my blog.
At this conference, not only did we use these communication badges pictured above, but we actually had the opportunity to meet Jim Sinclair, the inventor of these badges.
During the part of the conference in which Jim Sinclair gave us a history of Autism Network International (ANI)—which they were a co-founder of—they talked to us about the establishment of this particular piece of assistive technology.  Basically, it was a simple idea that seemed to fit a need and quickly became very popular among many autistic spaces for it’s practicality and ease of use.
The conference it originated from is called Autreat and is held annually by ANI. This is an autism conference that accepts Autistics and Cousins (ACs)—that is, anyone diagnosed or otherwise self-identifying with any disorder autistic or similar that may share a number of autistic traits.
There was a need.  The need was met.  This is how we can safely assume most technology either emerges or becomes popular.
We also talked about something called Universal Design and the Curb-Cutter Effect.  The Curb-Cutter Effect is when something to fit a specific need is found to create convenience in a broader area than intended.  Curb cuts allowing for wheelchair accessibility to sidewalks proved to also be convenient to anyone who may have trouble with steps or even simply a mother with a baby stroller or maybe a child with a wagon.  This is a desirable outcome with disability rights advocacy as creating convenience for non-disabled people often makes the assistive technology easier to advocate for.
In this sense, these colored communication badges could serve that Curb-Cutter effect.  Not only would this be perfectly acceptable for non-disabled people to use for convenience, but would also help to increase their effectiveness and convenience for those of us who need them.  Here are a few examples:
Increased popularity makes the colored communication badges more easily recognizable to the general public, making them as effective outside the above-mentioned autism conferences as inside.
Increase in demand would create increase in supply and availability, likely making these available to pretty much anyone and even being included with, say, the name tags you are required to wear at most cons.
In addition to these helping people recognize the communication state of the wearer, the wearer will be able to recognize whom they can feel more comfortable to approach.
Increased popularity would make these badges more acceptable for public use and less alienating to those who would wear them frequently.
This is not something that we are completely incapable of surviving without; this is something that was convenient and made our lives a lot easier.  If that can be easily shared with the general public, then what purpose does it serve not to share it?
Thank you for reading.

autieblesam:

[Image is a poster explaining briefly the origin and meaning of green, yellow, and red interaction signal badges, referred to above as Color Communication Badges.]

deducecanoe:

justsjwthings:

oldamongdreams:

greencarnations:

CAN WE DO THESE AT CONS

SECONDED.

if youre not autistic or suffer from an actual disorder, dont use these. its not cute.

er… you know a lot of autistic people go to conventions, right? And people with social anxiety disorders and panic disorders? Shit if I could get away with using this at work I would. 

Hello there, justsjwthings.

I would like to introduce myself.  I refer to myself as Sam Thomas, though my legal name and how a lot of people know me is Matthew.  I am officially diagnosed autistic.

Over one week in June 2013 (last summer), I was in Washington, DC for an autism conference called the Autism Campus Inclusion (ACI) summer leadership program run by the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network for autistic college students.

If you have any question as to the truth of this, I would like to direct your attention to this YouTube video that ASAN produced promoting the above-mentioned conference.  I appear as the first person in the video and you can find more images of my face on my blog.

At this conference, not only did we use these communication badges pictured above, but we actually had the opportunity to meet Jim Sinclair, the inventor of these badges.

During the part of the conference in which Jim Sinclair gave us a history of Autism Network International (ANI)—which they were a co-founder of—they talked to us about the establishment of this particular piece of assistive technology.  Basically, it was a simple idea that seemed to fit a need and quickly became very popular among many autistic spaces for it’s practicality and ease of use.

The conference it originated from is called Autreat and is held annually by ANI. This is an autism conference that accepts Autistics and Cousins (ACs)—that is, anyone diagnosed or otherwise self-identifying with any disorder autistic or similar that may share a number of autistic traits.

There was a need.  The need was met.  This is how we can safely assume most technology either emerges or becomes popular.

We also talked about something called Universal Design and the Curb-Cutter Effect.  The Curb-Cutter Effect is when something to fit a specific need is found to create convenience in a broader area than intended.  Curb cuts allowing for wheelchair accessibility to sidewalks proved to also be convenient to anyone who may have trouble with steps or even simply a mother with a baby stroller or maybe a child with a wagon.  This is a desirable outcome with disability rights advocacy as creating convenience for non-disabled people often makes the assistive technology easier to advocate for.

In this sense, these colored communication badges could serve that Curb-Cutter effect.  Not only would this be perfectly acceptable for non-disabled people to use for convenience, but would also help to increase their effectiveness and convenience for those of us who need them.  Here are a few examples:

  • Increased popularity makes the colored communication badges more easily recognizable to the general public, making them as effective outside the above-mentioned autism conferences as inside.
  • Increase in demand would create increase in supply and availability, likely making these available to pretty much anyone and even being included with, say, the name tags you are required to wear at most cons.
  • In addition to these helping people recognize the communication state of the wearer, the wearer will be able to recognize whom they can feel more comfortable to approach.
  • Increased popularity would make these badges more acceptable for public use and less alienating to those who would wear them frequently.

This is not something that we are completely incapable of surviving without; this is something that was convenient and made our lives a lot easier.  If that can be easily shared with the general public, then what purpose does it serve not to share it?

Thank you for reading.

feathers-ruffled:

feathers-ruffled:

Ok so I’ve been quiet about this for some time now, and I thought I should break that silence and make this public. (Hey other people are posting art PSA’s, this ain’t new)
We are Artists, We are many
Being a artist on Tumblr alone isnt easy. There are millions of other people  doing the exact same thing you’re doing. Amongst all of them you can be overlooked so easily. Now I am familiar with all those PSAs about not worrying about being popular and loving your own art. Thats all well and good, no ones debating that. But we artist want to share our art with the world. We want to show everyone what we can do.
The Wall
When we receive praise and love for our work, thats the best feeling in the world for us. We all have friends, fellow artists or not, that support us. But here on Tumblr, your art might not get pushed out into the crowd. For myself as an example, I get a 1 reblog for every 10 likes on something. And this is only including when I originally post it. When art post is liked, no one else sees it. Likes stay hidden and don’t appear on others dashes. (And yes, some blog themes do show likes, this I am aware)
Likes are good, but Reblogs do a lot more
When someone reblogs your art, a whole new set of people get to see it. Most of them are people who have never seen your stuff before. For example, whenever Carbines Official WIldstar Tumblr reblogs my Wildstar art, I get bombarded with likes, reblogs even follows! But before that, when I post it in the first place, not much happens. Dont get me wrong, I’m grateful I get anything, but feedback and notoriety is what keeps an artist like me going, and many others as well. Now I may understand that sometimes something someone draws isn’t your cup of tea, that’s alright! But even if you show a little interest, a reblog does a world of difference.
Support your friends, Support those who care
I know this is all sounding a little preachy, but it’s something I needed to get off my chest. There are no complaints, there are no orders, just a call out from all us artists. From the big and professional, to the small and unseen. We all want to share our art with the world, and it can all begin with a reblog.
( I dont think I need to say that everyone should reblog this, it goes without saying no?)

reblogging for  awareness

feathers-ruffled:

feathers-ruffled:

Ok so I’ve been quiet about this for some time now, and I thought I should break that silence and make this public. (Hey other people are posting art PSA’s, this ain’t new)

We are Artists, We are many

Being a artist on Tumblr alone isnt easy. There are millions of other people  doing the exact same thing you’re doing. Amongst all of them you can be overlooked so easily. Now I am familiar with all those PSAs about not worrying about being popular and loving your own art. Thats all well and good, no ones debating that. But we artist want to share our art with the world. We want to show everyone what we can do.

The Wall

When we receive praise and love for our work, thats the best feeling in the world for us. We all have friends, fellow artists or not, that support us. But here on Tumblr, your art might not get pushed out into the crowd. For myself as an example, I get a 1 reblog for every 10 likes on something. And this is only including when I originally post it. When art post is liked, no one else sees it. Likes stay hidden and don’t appear on others dashes. (And yes, some blog themes do show likes, this I am aware)

Likes are good, but Reblogs do a lot more

When someone reblogs your art, a whole new set of people get to see it. Most of them are people who have never seen your stuff before. For example, whenever Carbines Official WIldstar Tumblr reblogs my Wildstar art, I get bombarded with likes, reblogs even follows! But before that, when I post it in the first place, not much happens. Dont get me wrong, I’m grateful I get anything, but feedback and notoriety is what keeps an artist like me going, and many others as well. Now I may understand that sometimes something someone draws isn’t your cup of tea, that’s alright! But even if you show a little interest, a reblog does a world of difference.

Support your friends, Support those who care

I know this is all sounding a little preachy, but it’s something I needed to get off my chest. There are no complaints, there are no orders, just a call out from all us artists. From the big and professional, to the small and unseen. We all want to share our art with the world, and it can all begin with a reblog.

( I dont think I need to say that everyone should reblog this, it goes without saying no?)

reblogging for  awareness

megachikorita:

you kids these days with your rapidly growing concern for the state of the world and your knowledge of important issues at increasingly younger ages despite having been told your opinions don’t matter by the adults who put you in these situations